von BK-Christian | 14.03.2021 | eingestellt unter: Warlord Games / Bolt Action

Epic Battles: American Civil War Erweiterungen

Warlord Games haben neue Preorders online gestellt.

WG American Civil War Dismounted Cavalry 1 WG American Civil War Dismounted Cavalry 2 WG American Civil War Dismounted Cavalry 3

Epic Battles: American Civil War Dismounted Cavalry – €51,04 EUR

Warlord Resin

The role of Cavalry during the American Civil War went through a peculiar evolution. The realities of the evolving battlefield required a change from the tactics of previous wars. A headlong charge into formed enemy infantry or artillery became an unnecessary risk, the firepower they wielded more than enough to prevent any such charge from hitting home. Cavalry thus fought differently in the civil war than previous conflicts, though their role was no less pivotal. Headlong cavalry charges were largely replaced by cavalrymen acting more as dragoons – mounted infantry.

Cavalry combined two useful military attributes: mobility and firepower. Though perhaps outranged by an infantry regiment with rifles the cavalry could still dismount to hold ground temporarily until relieved by the infantry. Armed with a carbine a trooper could dismount and fight perhaps as effectively as his infantry counterpart. In this role the cavalry would invariably dismount into a skirmish screen, with nominally a quarter of the troopers detailed as horse holders, though some commanders preferred to think of the “fourth man” forming a reserve to be called upon if the line was hard pressed. Commonly a regiment in a brigade might be held in reserve, mounted, whilst the remainder of the brigade fought on foot. Such tactics sat well with the cavalry who saw the mounted charge as risky and perhaps even futile.

This set provides a brigade of three regiments – each with three stands of dismounted infantry and one of horseholders, suitable for both Union and Confederate Armies.

WG American Civil War Skirmishers 1 WG American Civil War Command Strips 2 WG American Civil War Command Strips 3

Epic Battles: American Civil War Skirmishers – €31,90 EUR

Warlord Resin

Skirmishing troops were important parts of Union and Confederate battleplans during the American Civil War. Ranging ahead of the main attack columns, skirmishers advanced in loose formations to harass the enemy, draw fire, and ’screen‘ the troops behind them ahead of a major bayonet charge.

Skirmishers deployed ahead of the main battle line to do damage by shooting and unsettle the enemy line prior to the assault. These detached soldiers would move ahead of the main body in extended order with gaps of perhaps five yards between men, making best use of the cover available, even trying to work in pairs, ideally using a fire and movement system as they advanced. Their aim was to draw the enemy’s fire and to do damage, making the enemy unsettled enough for a bayonet charge from the main body.

Skirmishers were not always used, however. Once deployed, they tended to become uncontrollable as each man sought to take shelter away from his officers. Rates of fire slackened as each man might try to take more careful aim with what was, actually, an inherently inaccurate weapon. They would also not be used where the aim of the battleplan was to inflict as much damage as possible by mass of firepower.

The models in this boxed set are suitable to represent Skirmishers for both Union and Confederate armies. They can equally be used to represent famous regiments such as Berdan’s Sharpshooters on the Union side to the Rebel Whitworth Sharpshooters.

Boxed Set contains 10 stands of Epic Battles: ACW Skirmishers, suitable for both Confederate & Union Generals.

WG American Civil War Command Strips 1

Epic Battles: American Civil War Command strips – €15,31 EUR

Warlord Resin

The Confederate and Union Infantry Brigade plastic sprues are designed to allow for regiments comprising 5 stands. These ACW Command strips allow players, should they wish, to field smaller units. These strips will replace one front rank strip from the plastic kit, allowing more command stands to be built.

This pack contains 5 strips of Confederate or Union Infantry.

WG American Civil War Wagon 1 WG American Civil War Wagon 2

Epic Battles: American Civil War Wagon – €15,31 EUR

Warlord Resin

Each gun in an artillery battery was drawn by a limber pulled by four or six horses and the battery’s ammunition was carried in the limber as well as in caissons. Some batteries were also designated as light, or horse, artillery. These provided the faster gun teams but their actual guns were of the same types as their “foot” colleagues. Their speed was achieved by having better horses in the limber teams if at all possible, but most obviously, by mounting the gun crews on horses. Such batteries were thus able to keep pace with the cavalry.

WG American Civil War Limber 1 WG American Civil War Limber 2

Epic Battles: American Civil War Limber – €15,31 EUR

Warlord Resin

This wagon can be used to represent either a US Army supply wagon or a Rebel one. Often wagons would be employed to support artillery batteries. These models add extra flavour to a battlefield, whether in support of your artillery along with a limber or simply to dress the battlefield. You could even use multiples to represent a key battlefield objective in certain scenarios.

WG American Civil War Confederate Command

Epic Battles: American Civil War Confederate Command – €7,66 EUR

Robert E. Lee: The son of ‘Light Horse Harry’ Lee, an officer who served in a previous rebellion, Robert Edward Lee graduated top in his class at West Point at the start of his military career. He was an accomplished officer and had served across the country and provided staunch service during the Mexican War. When Virginia seceded Lee felt bound to his native state and resigned his commission in the Regular Army, offering his services to Virginia and the fledgling Confederacy. Famously, Lee was offered command of the Union forces about to head south, but felt honour bound and declined.

During the next four years he proved to be one of the greatest battlefield commanders and tacticians of his age. He invaded the North late in ’62 and held McClellan again at Sharpsburg (Antietam). On the strategic defensive in early ’63 he defeated The Army of the Potomac at Chancellorsville in May where Jackson fell. On the offensive in June he led his army into Pennsylvania and the climactic battle of Gettysburg where he was checked by Meade.

On the defensive, Lee was initially able to match and hold Grant as he bore down on the Confederacy in ’64 and ’65, but eventually no amount of tactical genius could offset the numerical and technical superiority of the Union. With his lines around Petersburg breeched Lee abandoned the city and Richmond and struck out west trying to avoid the circling Union armies. Eventually Lee was compelled to surrender himself and his army to Grant at Appomattox Court House on April 9th, 1865.

Note that this figure has a brand-new pose and differs from the ACW pre-order exclusive figure.

Thomas ‘Stonewall’ Jackson: Jackson is one of most able Confederate commanders and is only eclipsed, perhaps, by Lee. Thomas Jonathan „Stonewall“ Jackson was an instructor at the Virginia Military Institute when war broke out and offered his services to his native state, Virginia. At First Manassas he won immortality when his brigade held its ground in the face of a heavy Union assault. A fellow officer, noting Jackson’s brigade and trying to rally his own men, called out: “Look, there stands Jackson – like a stone wall!” The name stuck.

Jackson was placed in command of the Confederate forces operating in the Shenandoah Valley and promptly lead his Union opponents a merry chase. By a series of forced marches with his infantry, or “foot cavalry” as they became known due to their speed, he was able to surprise and defeat all the Union forces sent against him in isolation. His antics were largely aided by the fact that he had a much better map of the Valley than his opponents – reputedly 10 ft long! At Antietam his corps held all of McClellan’s uncoordinated assaults despite heavy losses and at Fredericksburg his troops performed the same duty. In May of 1863 he and Lee masterminded a flank assault that broke Hooker’s will and drove the Army of the Potomac north. It was at the moment of his greatest success that he was accidentally shot by his own men on the evening of the 2nd May while reconnoitering the Union lines ready for a renewal of the action. Carried from the field, his left arm was amputated but complications ensued and he died on the 10th May 1863.

Also included is a HQ standard Bearer.

This pack contains 3 mounted command figures in Warlord Resin.

WG American Civil War Union Command

Epic Battles: American Civil War Union Command – €7,66 EUR

Ulysses S. Grant: Ulysses Simpson Grant, or more accurately Hiram Ulysses Grant (he was registered incorrectly at West Point) was a total failure. He failed in several business ventures; when president his administration was rocked by scandals; he lost most of his wealth after the war in further failed ventures and only gained back some funds by publishing his memoirs. Grant – the failure. However, there was one enterprise at which Grant excelled – War!

Grant had served in the Mexican War but then left the army to pursue a career in business. When war came in 1861 he promptly rejoined offering his services to the cause of Union. Initially serving as a brigade commander in 1862 he was promoted to major general and secured Kentucky and most of Tennessee for the Union. At Shiloh in 1862 he was surprised by Johnston’s Confederates but, completely unfazed by the initial setbacks, launched a counter-attack and won the battle. In July 1863 Grant outmanoeuvred and defeated the Confederate forces defending Vicksburg and captured the city in July, in effect splitting the Confederacy, the navy already having secured passage of the Mississippi river. Grant was not present at Chickamauga, but was in command at the victory of Chattanooga/Missionary Ridge. In light of his successes Grant was promoted to Lieutenant General and commander of all of the Union armies. Grant then came East to oversee the campaign against Lee and the Army of Northern Virginia. Although Meade remained in command of the Army of the Potomac Grant went along with it, effectively using Meade’s own headquarters and staff as a post office for issuing his own orders. The battles against Lee in 1864 have gone down in history as some of the most savage of the war. Grant was often held by Lee but, again unfazed, he refused to acknowledge defeat and simply shifted his entire army “to the left”, forcing Lee to follow him to the next bloody encounter. Eventually Grant trapped Lee in a siege at Petersburg, a campaign of attrition then ensued.

Whilst sat outside Petersburg Grant oversaw other operations against the Confederacy, most notably those conducted by Sherman and Sheridan. In April ’65 Grant finally broke through Lee’s defences, captured Petersburg and then Richmond – the long sought after prize of the past four years. 68 June 26th 1862 – The Battle of Mechanicsville, Virginia Lee was finally cornered at Appomattox and compelled to surrender what remained of his army to a generous Grant. Denounced by many as a “butcher” for his losses during the battles against Lee Grant is still undoubtedly one of the great commanders of the age.

George Meade: George Gordon Meade is best known for his defeat of Confederate General Robert E. Lee at the Battle of Gettysburg. With a military background honed by experience in the Second Seminole War and the Mexican-American War, Meade served as a Union General in the American Civil War. From initially commanding a brigade in the Peninsula Campaign and the Seven Days Battles, to meeting great success as a division commander, particularly at the Battle of Fredericksburg, he eventually rose to command the Army of the Potomac.

This command came only three days before the crucial Battle of Gettysburg, and he only arrived in the field after the first day of action on July 1. The Army of the Potomac used favourable ground and positioning to repel a series of large-scale assaults over the next two days. Robert E. Lee’s Army of North Virginia, unable to overcome these defences was forced to retreat, ending his hope of invading the North. Though hailed as a great victory, it was undermined by the perceived ineffectiveness of Meade’s pursuit of the retreat, which prevented Lee’s total destruction. In the latter years of the war his influence was overshadowed by that of general-in-chief, Ulysses S. Grant, who accompanied him through the Overland Campaign, the Richmond-Petersburg Campaign and the Appomattox Campaign.

Note that this figure has a brand-new pose and differs from the ACW pre-order exclusive figure.

Also included is a HQ standard Bearer.

This pack contains 3 mounted command figures in Warlord Resin.

WG American Civil War Wave 3 Confederate Pre Order Bundle

Black Powder: American Civil War Wave 3 Confederate Pre-Order Bundle – €188.86 EUR €165.89 EUR

Get two of each of the new ACW Wave 3 Box Sets: Skirmishers and Dismounted Cavalry in this convenient bundle.

The new skirmishers and dismounted cavalry perfectly complement the Infantry Brigades found in the Epic Battles American Civil War Starter Set, and afford players additional tactical flexibility, not to mention enlivening the battlefield.

Skirmishing troops were important parts of Union and Confederate battleplans during the American Civil War. Ranging ahead of the main attack columns, skirmishers advanced in loose formations to harass the enemy, draw fire, and ’screen‘ the troops behind them ahead of a major bayonet charge.

The military use of cavalry saw some radical changes from previous wars. Unwilling to needlessly sacrifice troops in headlong charges that could no longer hit home against the firepower of opposing infantry and cavalry formations. Their role thus became more akin to that of a dragoon – mounted infantry.

You’ll receive 6 regiments of dismounted cavalry (18 stands of dismounted infantry and 6 stands of horseholders) and 20 stands of skirmishers.

You’ll also receive 3 mounted command miniatures and a pack of the new casualty markers (12 infantry & 6 Cavalry) free as part of this bundle – this deal is only available as a pre-order.

Full Contents:

  • 2 x Black Powder Epic Battles: ACW Dismounted Cavalry Box Sets
  • 2 x Black Powder Epic Battles: ACW Skirmishers Box Sets
  • 1 x FREE Black Powder Epic Battles: ACW Confederate Command
  • 1 x FREE Black Powder Epic Battles: ACW Casualty

WG American Civil War Wave 3 Union Pre Order Bundle

Black Powder: American Civil War Wave 3 Union Pre-Order Bundle – €188.86 EUR €165.89 EUR

Get two of each of the new ACW Wave 3 Box Sets: Skirmishers and Dismounted Cavalry in this convenient bundle.

The new skirmishers and dismounted cavalry perfectly complement the Infantry Brigades found in the Epic Battles American Civil War Starter Set, and afford players additional tactical flexibility, not to mention enlivening the battlefield.

Skirmishing troops were important parts of Union and Confederate battleplans during the American Civil War. Ranging ahead of the main attack columns, skirmishers advanced in loose formations to harass the enemy, draw fire, and ’screen‘ the troops behind them ahead of a major bayonet charge.

The military use of cavalry saw some radical changes from previous wars. Unwilling to needlessly sacrifice troops in headlong charges that could no longer hit home against the firepower of opposing infantry and cavalry formations. Their role thus became more akin to that of a dragoon – mounted infantry.

You’ll receive 6 regiments of dismounted cavalry (18 stands of dismounted infantry and 6 stands of horseholders) and 20 stands of skirmishers.

You’ll also receive 3 mounted command miniatures and a pack of the new casualty markers (12 infantry & 6 Cavalry) free as part of this bundle – this deal is only available as a pre-order.

Full Contents:

  • 2 x Black Powder Epic Battles: ACW Dismounted Cavalry Box Sets
  • 2 x Black Powder Epic Battles: ACW Skirmishers Box Sets
  • 1 x FREE Black Powder Epic Battles: ACW Union Command
  • 1 x FREE Black Powder Epic Battles: ACW Casualty

Quelle: Warlord Games

BK-Christian

Chefredakteur von Brückenkopf-Online und Tabletop Insider. Seit 2002 im Hobby, erstes Tabletop Warhammer Fantasy (Dunkelelfen). Aktuelle Projekte: Primaris Space Marines, Summoners (alle Fraktionen), Deadzone/Warpath (Asterianer und Enforcer), Kings of War (Basilea und Oger), Dropfleet Commander (PHR).

Ähnliche Artikel
  • Warlord Games / Bolt Action

Bolt Action: Neue Kommandos

01.06.20212
  • Warlord Games / Bolt Action

Bolt Action: Island Assault!

27.04.20215
  • Warlord Games / Bolt Action

Bolt Action: Jagdtiger Preorder

19.04.20218

Kommentare

  • Der Preis für die abgesessene Kavallerie ist einfach absurd.

    Und die handvoll Skirmisher sind auch verhältnismäßig teuer.

    Schade, da bisher nur diesd beiden Einheiten die starren Marschposen der sonstigen Truppen auflockern.

    Der Planwagen und das bespannte Geschütz sind nette Gimmicks. Mal sehen, ob die über meinen Händler des Vertrauens zu bekommen sind.

    Aber erstmal auf die Auslieferung der vorbestellten Startbox warten.

  • Unglaublich.
    Horrende Preise für das Warlord Resin, bei dem es immer ein Glücksspiel ist, ob es was taugt…
    Und dann noch Resin in dem Maßstab…

    Wenn der Kram am Markt zündet verliere ich endgültig den Glauben an den gesunden Menschenverstand.

  • Schaue ich mir die Preise an, so scheint Warlordgames wohl eher den amerikanischen Markt im Auge zu haben.

  • Für alle, die das Grundset haben, oder damit liebäugeln: Kallistra hat eine sehr umfangreiche und gute Serie an Modellen, die gut zu den von Warlords passt.

    Zu den Preisen wurde alles gesagt. Ich kriege dafür ja schon Warmaster minis bei ebay 🙂

  • Ich bin mehr als gespannt, ob sich dieser Preis am überhaupt am Markt durchsetzt. Das sind doch schon nahezu Preise wienfür 28mm Figuren. Also ich bin immer weniger ein Fan von dieser Firma. Deren napoleonischen Figuren sind meistens mies und historisch häufig fragwürdig. Deren ww2 Figuren sind positiv ausgedrückt sehr charakterstark. Aber da konnte man immer vor den perry boxen sagen, Hauptsache günstig. Dann kamen in den napoleonischen Boxen weniger Minis rein… jetzt solche Preise, dann das Material. Ich bin gespannt, wie sich es durchsetzen wird. Ich kann es mir nicht vorstellen.

  • Dann eben nur die Grunbox und die Kernregimenter von Warlord, für die Skirmisher gibt es genug Alternativen, wie Newline oder Kallistra.

    Diese Preise sind absurd.

  • Und noch ein Zusatz, gestern kam die Mail, dass bei Warlord ab jetzt nur Sendungen ab 150€ Portofrei sind, Sendungen zwischen 50 und 150€ kosten 24€ Versand. Dafür bekommt man eine Plastikbox ihrer „Bestseller“ extra als „Entschädigung“.
    Bestellungen unter 50€ werden gar nicht mehr verschickt.

  • Ehrlich gesagt, bei der Zielgruppe wurde ja schon gesagt, dass man auch andere Szenarien bedienen will…aber bei den Preisen, ne danke. Wundert halt ein wenig, weil das System so schnell zu Totgeburt wird, gerade mit nem neuen Maßstab.

  • Wie sind eigentlich die Miniaturen von Viktrix im allgemeinen (historische Korrektheit, Material, Auswahl)?

    • Meinst du die 12mm Sachen? Oder 28mm? Ich hatte die nich nicht in der Hand. Aber es ist so ein Unding, dass jetzt jeder Hersteller seinen eigenen Maßstab macht. Das ist doch Quatsch.

      • 12mm (=heroic 10mm) gibt es schon seit Jahrzehnten. Das ist genauso eine Entwicklung wie 28mm, das ursprünglich heroic 25mm war, und mittlerweile eher in Richtung 32-35mm geht, oder 18mm (=heroic 15mm).

        Du wirst fast nirgendwo einheitliche Maßstäbe finden, selbst bei angeblich maßstabsgetreuen Modellen. Schau mal auf Plastic Soldier Review nach, wie stark 1/72 minis schwanken, und wenn ich in meiner Sammlung mich umschaue hat wirklich fast jeder Hersteller das Problem, das im Laufe der Zeit seine Minis schwanken (meist wachsen).

    • Die 28mm Antiquity Range ist so ziemlich Akkurat.

      Die 12mm WW2 Fahrzeuge sind Teilweise etwas inakkurat, die Frontpanzerung beim Cromwell ist stark angeschrägt; hat’s beim Original NIE gegeben.

  • Bezüglich der Preise: bestellt man z.B. die vergleichbare Skirmisher bei newline dann bezahlt man inklusive Porto 30 €. Hier kosten die 32 €, berücksichtigt man die üblichen 15% Rabatt sind es nur noch ca. 27 € und in Kombination mit weiteren Artikeln gibt’s auch kostenlosen Versand bei den üblichen Webshops (den gibt es bei und Bestellung bei newline nicht).
    Bezüglich Qualität kann ich zu beiden Serien nichts sagen.

    • In der warlord skirmish Packung sind 10 Stands mit 40 Figuren (wenn man die liegenden x2 zählt).

      Bei Newline kosten 30 Miniaturen 6€, Versand 20%, heißt bei 60 Figuren 16€ inkl. Versand.

      Das ist die Hälfte

      • Hab ich was übersehen? Wo gibt es denn 30 Minus für 6€?
        Bin von 2.10 Pfund für 4 ausgegangen. Es gibt noch 24 für 9.80 Pfund, aber das wäre Linie und müsste ja mit den Plastikminis verglichen werden. Oder gucke ich im falschen Shop?

      • Falscher Maßstab, das sind 12mm Figuren, also vergleichbar mit 10mm. Nicht den 20mm Figuren von Newline.
        In der Größe noch ähnlicher ist allerdings Kallistra.

  • Jo, Warlord Games macht sich leider gerade so ziemlich die Reputation kaputt, die man sich damals noch aufgebaut hat, als man mit Black Powder, Hail Cesar sowie Pike & Shot die Nische bedienen wollte, die durch die Einstellung von Warhammer Historicals entstanden war. 🙁

    Neben diesem verkorksten Release der Epic Battles und die miese Qualität der Resin-Güsse wäre da ja als jüngste Beispiel ja auch diese Aktion mit SPQR (das erste Regelwerk war voller Fehler und quasi unspielbar; nun bietet man quasi das Update als 2. Edition an und Besitzer dieser unspielbaren 1. Edition müssen zumindest eine Box kaufen, um das Errata zu bekommen…) usw.

    Es gibt zwar durchaus gute Produkte in der Range (z. B. die Italian Wars Reihe oder auch Teile der BA Range), aber in meinen Augen macht Warlord Games gerade den Fehler, den kompletten Markt mehr oder weniger zu ignorieren, was aber gerade im Historischen Table Top fatal sein kann, da dieses davon lebt, Figuren verschiedener Hersteller zu mischen und unterschiedliche Regelwerke mit der gleichen Sammlung zu spielen.

    Hier muss WG echt langsam mal anfangen umzudenken und aufhören zu glauben, dass GW im historischen Sektor sein zu müssen. Mit Perry Miniatures und Victrix hat man hier zwei starke Konkurrenten am Markt, die in den letzten Jahren fast immer die Nase vorn in Sachen wie Produktqualität oder Preis/Lesitungs-Verhältnis hatten. Und dann etablieren sich mit Rubicon Models und Wargames Atlantic ja auch gerade zwei weitere, sehr gute Hersteller am Markt. Gerade Wargames Atlantic macht das, was Warlord Games damals noch auszeichnete -> umfangreiche Plastikboxen in Bereichen, wo es bisher nur Zinn gab.

    Selbst Marktriese GW gibt da gerade ein besseres Bild ab. Klar, GW ist auch teuer, aber da kriegt man wenigsten gefühlt was in Form der Qualität der Plastikgüsse.

    • Stimmt, meine Hoffnung liegt auf wargames atlantic. Wirklich sehr schöne Minis, die mich bisher gesehen habe. Bin gespannt, wie das weitergeht mit denen.
      Italian Range habe sie meiner Erinnerung nach einem kleinen deutschen Unternehmen abgekauft. Gloria miniatures oder so.
      Die ersten Bold action Figuren aus Zinn waren klasse..gibt es nur nicht mehr. Alle meine ich von Paul Hicks modelliert.
      Nachdem warlord wargames factory gekauft haben, hatte in auf deren deutsche und amerikanische ww2 Plastikbixen gehofft. Aber das würde dann nicht unter deren Namen veröffentlicht. Schade eigentlich

      • WLG haben auch die Spanish Succession War (1701-1714) Reihe von Wargames Factory geschrottet indem sie bei der Infanterie haufenweise Optionen rausgenommen haben…

        Die Modelle für Victory at Sea sind echter Resinschrott..

  • Die Preise finde ich übertrieben, vor allem für “Warlord Resin“. Dann lieber gleich Weichplastik und dafür für nen Bruchteil des jetzigen Preises.

    Warlord Games haben für mich leider mehr Licht als Schatten. Von der 28mm Plastik WW2 Range habe ich auch Abstand genommen, die Proportionen und Details gefallen mir gar nicht. Gegen Wargames Atlantic und Rubicon stinken die da ab. Auch die neuen Resistance Zinn Minis sind lächerlich schlecht, irgendwie hab ich immer den Eindruck, die müssen auf biegen und brechen mit der uralt Foundry Range kompatibel sein (Zwergenstatur, Hände größer als die Köpfe, unglaublich lieblose Gesichter etc.). WGA hat da deutlich die Nase vorn.

  • Hoffentlich kauft warlord games nicht wargames atlantic auf. Damals hatte ich auch große Hoffnung in wargames factory gesetzt. Okay die Cäsarianer waren verwaschenen, aber die anderen Sets ww2 sagen besser aus. Die awi sind ja bei warlord später rausgekommen und ich finde sie sehr steif.

    • Ich würde mal vermuten, dass Atlantic zu clever und erfolgreich sind, um sich aktuell zu verkaufen.

  • Hm schade. Die reguläre Infanterie für das Epic American Civil War Spiel fand ich ja ziemlich gut. Da bekommt man auch für den Preis eine ordentliche Masse aufs Feld.

    Aber die hier gezeigte Resin Infanterie ist doch arg teuer. Über 50 Euro für drei Streifen abgesessene Kavallerie oder 15 Euro für einen Mini-Planwagen. Ziemlich viel, vor allem im historischen Bereich…

    • Ja, das gute Einstiegsangebot wird mit den nachfolgenden Veröffentlichungen torpediert.

      Es wirkt alles relativ unausgegoren.

      Die deutschen Händler bieten zwar aktuell gute Rabatte an, ob diese aber dauerhaft haltbar sind bleibt abzuwarten.

Die Kommentarfunktion ist geschlossen.